| science

Latest News

The Proposals of Individual Differences and Multiple Intelligences
Education

The Proposals of Individual Differences and Multiple Intelligences

This is a general education post on how students can use their "individual differences" in the classroom to understand subjects clearly. There are four proposals on how individual differences should be used in a classroom environment, and this post is dedicated to merging the theory of "multiple intelligences" into the four proposals. Disclaimer: this post…

Catherine the Great

Professionalizing History

You might enjoy...

The Broletariat Podcast

The History of America

The Endless Flow of Society

Recommended Articles

  • Substitute Teachers and Relating to Students
    Education

    Substitute Teachers and Relating to Students

    To be a successful substitute teacher, one must be able to understand how to balance information alongside reason. One main problem is that in the state of Florida, a part-time substitute teacher only needs an Associate’s Degree. The state tends to keep substitute teachers on a completely different standard of education than the so-called standard ones.…

  • The Marva Collins Story: Bureaucracy in Education
    Education

    The Marva Collins Story: Bureaucracy in Education

    Mrs. Marva Collins, a full-time substitute teacher in the “ghettos” of mid-1970s Chicago, found herself in a rather difficult decision when it came to how she could run her class. With rowdiness and pseudo-fights occurring in the hallways before the two minute and fifty second mark was even past, it’s obvious that the learning environment…

  • Merging Technology with Kagan
    Education

    Merging Technology with Kagan

    If you're in the public education system, then you've heard about (or have been forced to use) Kagan activities like Bloom’s Taxonomy Questions and the Fan-n-Pick Strategy – two methods to incite engagement through knowledge-based questions that we'll be talking about today. I personally have a bias against Kaganist (clever pun, please love it) activities, but…

  • DeVostating the Education System
    Education

    DeVostating the Education System

    Conservatism is at it again with attempts to destroy the public education system. At this point, it is almost certain that Betsy DeVos - the multi-billionaire who has already begun the push for the privatization of education - will become America's 11th Education Secretary. If you've been living under a rock (or perhaps inside a nuclear…

  • Babylonian Astronomy
    History

    Babylonian Astronomy

    As long as mankind could ponder the world surrounding them, there’s been a unique interest in looking upwards. Some early societies looked up to the sun, grateful for plentiful harvest and fearing a drought that could end it all. Most, if not all, looked up for a heaven – a paradise that gave comfort after…

Environment

Education

Economics

  • The Broletariat [Episode 2] Common Sense
    Broletariat Podcast

    The Broletariat [Episode 2] Common Sense

    The Broletariat Podcast is a completely unscripted and unedited (and possibly incoherent) podcast consisting of Joseph Kaminski, Omar Wajeeh, and Elijah Hintz. We are not communists; the logo is situational irony. What’s situational irony? Beats us. Probably like a fire station burning down or something. Sounds like us. We upload episodes to our channel every

    16
  • Babylonian Astronomy
    History

    Babylonian Astronomy

    As long as mankind could ponder the world surrounding them, there’s been a unique interest in looking upwards. Some early societies looked up to the sun, grateful for plentiful harvest and fearing a drought that could end it all. Most, if not all, looked up for a heaven – a paradise that gave comfort after

    45
  • "Mystery Meat" Solved!
    Science

    "Mystery Meat" Solved!

    Throughout history, The Explorers Club has managed to hold membership to some of the greatest “firsts” in the fields of exploration. In 1909, members Robert E. Peary and Matthew Henson were the first to reach the north pole. In 1911, member Roald Amundsen made it to the south pole. In 1953, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay became the first to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. In 1960, Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard became the first to reach the deepest point of the ocean. In 1969, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins made history by being the first to reach the surface of the moon. In 1984, Barry Clifford officially became the first to recover an authenticated pirate ship, the Whydah Gally. But do The Explorers Club have another famous first? Were they the first to eat woolly mammoth in modern history?

    2
  • No, The Earth Isn't Flat. Idiots.
    Science

    No, The Earth Isn't Flat. Idiots.

    When I first heard people were discussing this topic on social media, I thought it was a hoax. I thought it was one of those sarcastic troll hashtags that were being used sarcastically. Then the truth hit me. People are this stupid. People are this incoherently unattached to the world of science and history. People are so dense, so ignorant, so pathetically unintelligent, that they believe that the Earth is flat.

    2
  • Video Games in History Class?
    Technology

    Video Games in History Class?

    I’ve had quite a few different types of history classes. Some of them are long, drawn out lectures with the teacher droning on and on about the economic expansion of colonial America for what seems like hours. Others have been interactive group-versus-group activities that fall just short of being games. Many, throughout Middle and High School, have been bubble worksheets, coloring books, and word searches. But, something crossed my mind a few days ago. With new advances in technology and design, and with entertainment seeming to merge with information…could a classroom environment be structured using video games?

    6
  • Four new elements added to Periodic table
    Science

    Four new elements added to Periodic table

    The world of science starts on an incredible platform this year after four new elements were added to the Periodic table. These four new elements, finally completing the table’s seventh row, are the first to be added since 2011, when elements 114 (Flerovium) and 116 (Livermorium) were added. Now that the world’s science textbooks have been instantly rendered out of date with the labeling of these four elements, the Periodic table has completed its seventh row after decades of scientific research. But what exactly are these four new elements with placeholder names, and what could their names be? After all, we’ll be seeing them in every chemistry book to be printed in the future!

    11
load more
Joseph Kaminski
I’m a writer and historian. Simple enough, right? I enjoy philosophy, sociology, social psychology, politics, basic programming, statistics, and old books.

Subscribe

Enter your email address to subscribe to this site and receive up-to-date notifications.

Join 348 other subscribers

AN IMPORTANT NOTICE

Dear reader,

In September 2016, my website server crashed. I've been working on fixing everything since.

This site is currently in a beta state, meaning that design changes and the addition of new features will be frequent.