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Joseph Kaminski

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November 22, 2017

revolution

Lexington

The History of America: The American Revolution

In a tense social situation where colonialists were staring at government problems from across an ocean, one could only predict when the final match would burn down the thirteen colonies’ relationship with the motherland. Mercantilism was beginning to actually backfire, to the dismay of the British crown, but it is sad to realize that the people in power refused to actually change their ideals and laws towards the people that were obviously receiving the short end of the stick.

The History of America: The Initial Rejection of an Empire

The end of the war for empire showed the powerhouse of Britain that debt wasn’t just a fictional plague. It was indeed a reality, and the Royal Government of Britain was over 122 million pounds of sterling silver in debt. Quite a large amount; this was a good sixty percent of all British revenues. Similar to how the French Revolution started, Britain had a large population that was paying more taxes than people that could actually afford it. Eight million people in Britain were being overloaded with new taxes, and the Treaty of Paris hastily demobilized large parts of the Royal Military so that the government wouldn’t have had to pay for soldiers they no longer needed.

The History of America: Mercantilism

The royal governments of Europe fell in love with these ideas almost immediately, and in 1689 the Parliament of England abolished all taxes on grain to drive down prices. This allowed English grain the cheapest in the world, and it sold quickly abroad — forcing countries to become dependent on Britain. Less than a year later, in 1690, the Parliament banned the sale of French liquor to encourage the manufacturing of English gin from, you guessed it, English grain. That same year, a centralized English bank was created to stabilize the currency. To make their economic power even stronger, the Parliament would force Scotland into “The United Kingdom” in 1707, successfully “taking” the wealth of another nation.

American Culture

The History of America: The Birth of American Culture

While the new American settlers were busy growing tobacco and building city churches in their new environment, European immigrants who moved to America didn’t cease being or wanting to be Europeans. In fact, they wanted to reshape their new homes and cities into what they had left behind in Europe instead of attempting to create their own new society. American culture didn’t actually exist at this time, as a majority of what could be considered culture in the new world was brought from other countries.