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The Proposals of Individual Differences and Multiple Intelligences
Education

The Proposals of Individual Differences and Multiple Intelligences

This is a general education post on how students can use their "individual differences" in the classroom to understand subjects clearly. There are four proposals on how individual differences should be used in a classroom environment, and this post is dedicated to merging the theory of "multiple intelligences" into the four proposals. Disclaimer: this post…

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    To be a successful substitute teacher, one must be able to understand how to balance information alongside reason. One main problem is that in the state of Florida, a part-time substitute teacher only needs an Associate’s Degree. The state tends to keep substitute teachers on a completely different standard of education than the so-called standard ones.…

  • The Marva Collins Story: Bureaucracy in Education
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    The Marva Collins Story: Bureaucracy in Education

    Mrs. Marva Collins, a full-time substitute teacher in the “ghettos” of mid-1970s Chicago, found herself in a rather difficult decision when it came to how she could run her class. With rowdiness and pseudo-fights occurring in the hallways before the two minute and fifty second mark was even past, it’s obvious that the learning environment…

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    Merging Technology with Kagan

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  • DeVostating the Education System
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    DeVostating the Education System

    Conservatism is at it again with attempts to destroy the public education system. At this point, it is almost certain that Betsy DeVos - the multi-billionaire who has already begun the push for the privatization of education - will become America's 11th Education Secretary. If you've been living under a rock (or perhaps inside a nuclear…

  • Babylonian Astronomy
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    Babylonian Astronomy

    As long as mankind could ponder the world surrounding them, there’s been a unique interest in looking upwards. Some early societies looked up to the sun, grateful for plentiful harvest and fearing a drought that could end it all. Most, if not all, looked up for a heaven – a paradise that gave comfort after…

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  • Goodnight, Elie Wiesel
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    Goodnight, Elie Wiesel

    Muhammad Ali, David Bowie, Prince, Nancy Reagan. 2016 has been a rather devastating year for deaths. But this one tops the list for me. Elie Wiesel, full name Eliezer Wiesel, was born on September 30th, 1928. A Romanian-born Jewish writer who lived a full life – through the highest highs and lowest lows – Wiesel was an outstanding political activist who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 for speaking out against the repression and violence stemming from racism. Wiesel was the recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal in 1985, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and countless other awards. And, as most people know of him, Wiesel was a Holocaust survivor.

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  • H.M.S. Pinafore: Plot Summary and Analysis
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    H.M.S. Pinafore: Plot Summary and Analysis

    The H.M.S. Pinafore, also known as The Lass That Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera which was first presented at London’s Opera Comique on May 25th, 1878. It should be relevant to discuss how successful this play was during its original running, having exactly 571 performances before fading off the stage – making it the second-longest running of a musical theatre piece at the time. The fourth collaboration between Gilbert and Sullivan, H.M.S. Pinafore was their first international sensation and eventually becoming one of the most intriguing plays of the era.

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  • The History of America: The Birth of American Culture
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    The History of America: The Birth of American Culture

    While the new American settlers were busy growing tobacco and building city churches in their new environment, European immigrants who moved to America didn’t cease being or wanting to be Europeans. In fact, they wanted to reshape their new homes and cities into what they had left behind in Europe instead of attempting to create their own new society. American culture didn’t actually exist at this time, as a majority of what could be considered culture in the new world was brought from other countries.

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    Book Review: Plagues and Peoples

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  • J. R. R. Tolkien and The First World War
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    J. R. R. Tolkien and The First World War

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    Book Review: The Guns of the South

    Very interesting, very questioning, and overall a fantastic merge of pure fiction and an alternative perspective for what might have taken place had the South gotten a hold of machinery and weaponry more powerful than the Union. There are very few moments that make me question the time period — showing lots of research on the Civil War and the society that functioned within it. But, hardcore historians have to realize that this is a work of fiction — sci-fi time travelling mixed with mind blowing alternate detail.

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  • Queen Elizabeth’s Poetry
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    Queen Elizabeth’s Poetry

    Queen Elizabeth I is perhaps one of the most influential and well-recognized figures in all of history. As the ruler of England and Ireland from November 17th, 1558 until her death on March 24th, 1603, Elizabeth I oversaw a cultural movement which propelled flourishing literature and exploration. While history tends to focus on The Virgin Queen’s influence and political reign, her own name and status as an author tends to be left out of the limelight.

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  • The Problem With Being Remembered
    Philosophy

    The Problem With Being Remembered

    At birth, there is an introduction. A heavenly beacon of light to start it all. The world opens, and we begin to live. It all seems so wonderful, magical, and sensible. The first few chapters are great, and we all cling onto our chairs as we witness the stages of life develop right before our very eyes. In the middle, we learn. We turn into madmen – cynical to life’s wonders. I call this character development. At death, the story ends. Some end abruptly, others with a bang that allow them to stand out against countless other stories.

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  • Long John Silver: The Siege of Stereotyping
    Literature

    Long John Silver: The Siege of Stereotyping

    Ever since Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, the image of pirating and privateering overseas during the Golden Age of Piracy has been forever tarnished. Long gone are the days of fearsome men like Edward Teach (better known as Blackbeard), who would siege densely populated towns and plunder ships/ransom citizens in return for medical supplies. In today’s day and age, pirates have turned into happy-go-lucky cheery figures in a wide variety of movies, television shows, books and even songs. Long John Silver isn’t just a stereotype. To say that would be a huge understatement. Long John Silver is the stereotype that started all other stereotypes for pirates.

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Joseph Kaminski
I’m a writer and historian. Simple enough, right? I enjoy philosophy, sociology, social psychology, politics, basic programming, statistics, and old books.

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