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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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August 20, 2017

literature

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald and The First World War

The 1920’s, referred to as The Roaring Twenties, was a great decade to live in. Economics were prosperous, the social diversity was vigorous, and the cultural aspects of the western world was emphasized in almost every way imaginable. Jazz music exploded throughout the streets, modern fashion developed through the ‘flapper’ look of early-twentieth-century women from Britain to

Elie Wiesel

Goodnight, Elie Wiesel

Muhammad Ali, David Bowie, Prince, Nancy Reagan. 2016 has been a rather devastating year for deaths. But this one tops the list for me. Elie Wiesel, full name Eliezer Wiesel, was born on September 30th, 1928. A Romanian-born Jewish writer who lived a full life – through the highest highs and lowest lows – Wiesel was an outstanding political activist who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 for speaking out against the repression and violence stemming from racism. Wiesel was the recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal in 1985, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and countless other awards. And, as most people know of him, Wiesel was a Holocaust survivor.

HMS Pinafore

H.M.S. Pinafore: Plot Summary and Analysis

The H.M.S. Pinafore, also known as The Lass That Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera which was first presented at London’s Opera Comique on May 25th, 1878. It should be relevant to discuss how successful this play was during its original running, having exactly 571 performances before fading off the stage – making it the second-longest running of a musical theatre piece at the time. The fourth collaboration between Gilbert and Sullivan, H.M.S. Pinafore was their first international sensation and eventually becoming one of the most intriguing plays of the era.

American Culture

The History of America: The Birth of American Culture

While the new American settlers were busy growing tobacco and building city churches in their new environment, European immigrants who moved to America didn’t cease being or wanting to be Europeans. In fact, they wanted to reshape their new homes and cities into what they had left behind in Europe instead of attempting to create their own new society. American culture didn’t actually exist at this time, as a majority of what could be considered culture in the new world was brought from other countries.

Plagues and Peoples

Book Review: Plagues and Peoples

Plagues and Peoples by William H. McNeill is an extraordinary historical read consisting of humankind’s records and assumptions of disease throughout our known past. From the construction of early human migrations up until briefly mentioned cases of disease within the 20th century, the original book was published in 1975. The version I acquired, however, was a version printed with a revised preface discussing Ebola and Aids which was re-published in 1998.

J. R. R. Tolkien and The First World War

J. R. R. Tolkien is remembered for his extensive world of Middle Earth; but he also witnessed Hell on Earth in the trenches of World War I. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien found himself in a bit of a predicament after the United Kingdom entered the First World War in August of 1914. His relatives were shocked when they discovered that he, as a 22 year old young and strapping man, didn’t immediately volunteer his services for the British Army.

guns of the south

Book Review: The Guns of the South

Very interesting, very questioning, and overall a fantastic merge of pure fiction and an alternative perspective for what might have taken place had the South gotten a hold of machinery and weaponry more powerful than the Union. There are very few moments that make me question the time period — showing lots of research on the Civil War and the society that functioned within it. But, hardcore historians have to realize that this is a work of fiction — sci-fi time travelling mixed with mind blowing alternate detail.

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