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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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August 23, 2017

entertainment

No Man's Sky

Overhyped and Overpromised: The Problems with Marketing in the Gaming Industry

From branded institutions to independent developers, the concept of serial lying in the form of overpromising and overhyping has been a huge part of the advertising and marketing strategies behind some of the biggest flops in the past few years. From Peter Molyneux’s repeated “pathological lying” and Ubisoft’s horrendous handling of “Watch Dogs” to the laughable failure resulting in Hello Games’ “No Man Sky”, the methods and guidelines of marketing within the industry need to be recreated. Or maybe developers need to learn to shut the hell up.

Video Games in History Class?

I’ve had quite a few different types of history classes. Some of them are long, drawn out lectures with the teacher droning on and on about the economic expansion of colonial America for what seems like hours. Others have been interactive group-versus-group activities that fall just short of being games. Many, throughout Middle and High School, have been bubble worksheets, coloring books, and word searches. But, something crossed my mind a few days ago. With new advances in technology and design, and with entertainment seeming to merge with information…could a classroom environment be structured using video games?

The Establishment Video Game Industry

In modern America, the video game industry makes a whopping $22.41 billion dollars annually. The idea of entertainment, especially at our fingertips, has rapidly expanded into our everyday lives to create new advancements in technology, design, and (of course) corporate profits. With new platforms such as the mobile industry and ever-growing consoles taking control of the aspects of consumer entertainment, video games are becoming more and more prominent in our society. The video game industry has forced itself into our lives.