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Joseph Kaminski

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November 23, 2017

battle

ironclads

Book Review: Duel Between the First Ironclads

William C. Davis, author of Duel Between the First Ironclads, is a well-respected American historian who spent time as a Professor of History at Virginia Tech from 2000 – 2013; and he has spent most of his career doing research on the American South. He has written around forty books focused on southern U.S. history around

Lexington

The History of America: The American Revolution

In a tense social situation where colonialists were staring at government problems from across an ocean, one could only predict when the final match would burn down the thirteen colonies’ relationship with the motherland. Mercantilism was beginning to actually backfire, to the dismay of the British crown, but it is sad to realize that the people in power refused to actually change their ideals and laws towards the people that were obviously receiving the short end of the stick.

The Fall of The Zulu

This Anglo-Zulu War led to a major victory…and a major defeat. The British actually suffered a significant defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana around the 22nd of January 1879. The Zulu’s military killed more than 1000 British soldiers in a single day, the worst defeat the British army had ever suffered at the hands of an African fighting force. The Zulu Kingdom had proven the capability of well-organized tactical systems, the very same initiated in the Age of Shaka that allowed for such success to exist for decades.

The Rise of the Zulu

Born in 1787, Shaka Zulu was born as the illegitimate son to the chief of the Zulu clan, Senzangakhona kaJama. According to oral traditions, Shaka was conceived during an act of what began as “ukuhlobonga”, a form of sexual foreplay forbidding penetration which was socially allowed between unmarried or single couples. The word “Shaka” means “intestinal beetle” in the Zulu bantu language, showing just how his father felt about him

The Battle of Britain: 1940

During July of 1940, the people of Berlin were delighted with Hitler’s promises of success. France had collapsed after six weeks of fighting, and German troops stood on guard throughout Europe. Norway and Belgium, not to mention Poland, were under occupation. All that stands between Adolf Hitler and dictatorship of all of Europe is Great Britain. Conquest seems to be only a matter of time. Winston Churchill announced that Britain was unconquerable and that “the curse of Hitler will be lifted”, and for some period of time the British never thought of losing.