Go to ...

Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

Joseph Kaminski on YouTubeRSS Feed

July 21, 2017

APUSH

American Revolution

The History of America: Howe’s Perspective

William Howe saw North America rather clearly: as a threat. Not just any threat, however; William Howe saw the colonies as a rage-induced organization of militias who were banding together against the misdeeds of the British government. William Howe had one personal question for the colonials: how long could they keep it going?

Lexington

The History of America: The American Revolution

In a tense social situation where colonialists were staring at government problems from across an ocean, one could only predict when the final match would burn down the thirteen colonies’ relationship with the motherland. Mercantilism was beginning to actually backfire, to the dismay of the British crown, but it is sad to realize that the people in power refused to actually change their ideals and laws towards the people that were obviously receiving the short end of the stick.

The History of America: The Initial Rejection of an Empire

The end of the war for empire showed the powerhouse of Britain that debt wasn’t just a fictional plague. It was indeed a reality, and the Royal Government of Britain was over 122 million pounds of sterling silver in debt. Quite a large amount; this was a good sixty percent of all British revenues. Similar to how the French Revolution started, Britain had a large population that was paying more taxes than people that could actually afford it. Eight million people in Britain were being overloaded with new taxes, and the Treaty of Paris hastily demobilized large parts of the Royal Military so that the government wouldn’t have had to pay for soldiers they no longer needed.

The History of America: The First Great Awakening

One of the greatest ironic facts about American history — or perhaps one of the greatest thing about America in general, as some could easily argue — is that none of the colonies became exactly what they had been designed to be. For example, Virginia never made it to the status of “corporate powerhouse.” Pennsylvania never became, much to William Penn’s dismay, a paradise for Quaker ideals. Georgia’s “let the worst of the worst take control of their own colony” plan, for heaven knows why, failed after a few decades. For some, it seemed that every original American colonial idea went downhill before they even had a chance.

Why did Great Britain Industrialize Before France and Germany?

The Industrial Revolution caused several European nations to expand their economies and create new job opportunities. While some European countries, such as France and Germany, eventually did catch on to aspects of the growing Industrial World, the nation of Great Britain industrialized much faster than the rest of them and stood above the rest in industrial growth. Great Britain had several reasons that helped them succeed and industrialize faster than other nations, such as the fact that their population and middle class grew substantially, their coal and iron ore deposits were large and bunched in a close proximity of each other, and that their political policies on loans made it easy for enthusiastic merchants to begin a business.