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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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September 25, 2017

Science

Babylonian Astronomy

As long as mankind could ponder the world surrounding them, there’s been a unique interest in looking upwards. Some early societies looked up to the sun, grateful for plentiful harvest and fearing a drought that could end it all. Most, if not all, looked up for a heaven – a paradise that gave comfort after

"Mystery Meat" Solved!

Throughout history, The Explorers Club has managed to hold membership to some of the greatest “firsts” in the fields of exploration. In 1909, members Robert E. Peary and Matthew Henson were the first to reach the north pole. In 1911, member Roald Amundsen made it to the south pole. In 1953, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay became the first to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. In 1960, Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard became the first to reach the deepest point of the ocean. In 1969, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins made history by being the first to reach the surface of the moon. In 1984, Barry Clifford officially became the first to recover an authenticated pirate ship, the Whydah Gally. But do The Explorers Club have another famous first? Were they the first to eat woolly mammoth in modern history?

No, The Earth Isn't Flat. Idiots.

When I first heard people were discussing this topic on social media, I thought it was a hoax. I thought it was one of those sarcastic troll hashtags that were being used sarcastically. Then the truth hit me. People are this stupid. People are this incoherently unattached to the world of science and history. People are so dense, so ignorant, so pathetically unintelligent, that they believe that the Earth is flat.

Four new elements added to Periodic table

The world of science starts on an incredible platform this year after four new elements were added to the Periodic table. These four new elements, finally completing the table’s seventh row, are the first to be added since 2011, when elements 114 (Flerovium) and 116 (Livermorium) were added. Now that the world’s science textbooks have been instantly rendered out of date with the labeling of these four elements, the Periodic table has completed its seventh row after decades of scientific research. But what exactly are these four new elements with placeholder names, and what could their names be? After all, we’ll be seeing them in every chemistry book to be printed in the future!