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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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July 22, 2017

Philosophy

positivism-and-interpretivism

Positivism and Interactionists and Whatnot

The idea behind subjectivity in sociological research being invalid is supported by positivists; positivism is a specific philosophical and sociological perspective that states that positive knowledge is based on natural phenomena, and therefore interactive studies that include participants along with the researcher are invalid. Information must be interpreted through reason and logic, coming from derived

The Postmodernization of Sex, Gender, and HIV

The Postmodernization of Sex and Gender by William Simon is an interesting example on how modern idealism has changed over time. Postmodernism is essentially the modern-day brain-child of Western philosophy which focuses on the “construction of truth” throughout world views, religion, and identity. When understanding the “truth”, one must be willing to accept newly furnished

Postmodernism: A Brief Review of The Truth About The Truth

For longtime readers, you should recall my 2015 project The Endless Flow of Society. This review on The Truth About The Truth and the corresponding definition of postmodernism doesn’t go much farther than the introductory pages penned by Walter Truett Anderson, and it is essentially a recreation of my initial pages of my personal project The Endless Flow

Nietzsche vs Sartre

Existential Self-Realization: Comparing Nietzsche and Sartre

Nietzsche and Sartre are oftentimes compared as “atheistic existentialists” in the world of philosophy. One similarity between the two would have to be their use of in-depth analyzation for determining the process of life. Nietzsche, in “The Gay Science”, discusses the concept of Amor fati or “love of fate”, which is essentially Nietzsche’s definition of

honor

Should Honor Represent History?

History is remembered by and for the victor. Those who win decide the path of humanity through societal advancement. Those who look back at battle with a sense of nostalgia — that nationalistic narcissism that brings victory — tend to be the mainstream historians. Those of the losing side don’t oftentimes get the credit they deserve in our modern day history classes.

The Problem With Being Remembered

At birth, there is an introduction. A heavenly beacon of light to start it all. The world opens, and we begin to live. It all seems so wonderful, magical, and sensible. The first few chapters are great, and we all cling onto our chairs as we witness the stages of life develop right before our very eyes. In the middle, we learn. We turn into madmen – cynical to life’s wonders. I call this character development. At death, the story ends. Some end abruptly, others with a bang that allow them to stand out against countless other stories.