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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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August 23, 2017

Book Reviews

Half the Sky: Emancipation, Rights, and Educating Women

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide is an intriguing book – published in 2009 – that became the perfect candidate for a contemporary movie on ‘rights’. Essentially, the film (and book) showcases the stories of women of all backgrounds from across the globe in an attempt to showcase “gender-based crimes” that

Postmodernism: A Brief Review of The Truth About The Truth

For longtime readers, you should recall my 2015 project The Endless Flow of Society. This review on The Truth About The Truth and the corresponding definition of postmodernism doesn’t go much farther than the introductory pages penned by Walter Truett Anderson, and it is essentially a recreation of my initial pages of my personal project The Endless Flow

Book Review: The Economy of Colonial America by Edwin J. Perkins

Edwin J. Perkins, a leading figure in American economic history and one of the main three authors that depict the economic situations of the colonial era, is an emeritus professor at the University of Southern California. He currently resides in Laguana Woods in California, where he pursues his own research despite being “retired”, and spends

The Elizabethan Renaissance

Book Review: The Elizabethan Renaissance by A. L. Rowse

Alfred Leslie Rowse, oftentimes shortened to A. L. Rowse, is best known for his work on England under Queen Elizabeth I’s reign as monarch. He was born on December 4th, 1903, in Cornwall. Mr. Rowse is the perfect example of a man of greatness born against all odds, as both his mother and father lived

Forging the Star

Book Review: Forging the Star by David S. Turk

A bit of a disclaimer: I was contacted by the University of North Texas Press to review Forging the Star on my website before the book comes out this month. I received a free review copy of the book, but I did not let that cloud my judgement as I read. Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshals Service by David S. Turk is a fantastic read for anyone interested in American history. It’s well written, dedicated to facts, and structured to near-perfection.

Book Review: A History of the Wife

A History of the Wife is one of the best sociological works containing immense historical attributes and impactful perspectives that stuck with me from beginning to end. From the biblical tales of Adam and Eve to the late 1990’s representation of Hillary Clinton, author Marilyn Yalom drew records of historical significance and combined them with written analysis. A senior scholar at the Institute for Women and Gender at Stanford University (as of 2002), Marilyn Yalom obviously is an expert in the sociological constructs of gender and the passion for understanding the “roles” of husband and wife are blatantly obvious through every page.

Plagues and Peoples

Book Review: Plagues and Peoples

Plagues and Peoples by William H. McNeill is an extraordinary historical read consisting of humankind’s records and assumptions of disease throughout our known past. From the construction of early human migrations up until briefly mentioned cases of disease within the 20th century, the original book was published in 1975. The version I acquired, however, was a version printed with a revised preface discussing Ebola and Aids which was re-published in 1998.

guns of the south

Book Review: The Guns of the South

Very interesting, very questioning, and overall a fantastic merge of pure fiction and an alternative perspective for what might have taken place had the South gotten a hold of machinery and weaponry more powerful than the Union. There are very few moments that make me question the time period — showing lots of research on the Civil War and the society that functioned within it. But, hardcore historians have to realize that this is a work of fiction — sci-fi time travelling mixed with mind blowing alternate detail.

Book Review: The Revelation of Herman Smiley by Michael Andoscia

With a fantastic plot, interesting development, and an honestly perfect, rather humorous ending that actually made me laugh, The Revelation of Herman Smiley is definitely a book I’d recommend to anyone interested in philosophy, religion, or humanities in general. And even if you’re not interested in any of those things, you’d be surprised at how much you’ll learn from this 167 page book.

Book Review: Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Wonder, a modern classic in the young adult genre written by R. J. Palacio, is a story about a disfigured middle-schooler from the perspective of six (seven if you have the special edition) different characters. Touching on the concepts of bullying, friendship, and individuality, the book is obviously targeted towards preteens that deal with these topics on a day to day basis.