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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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September 22, 2017

Literature

CS-Lewis-featured

C.S. Lewis and The First World War

I’ll be the first to admit that C.S. Lewis is beyond my personal expertise. Although I’ve found myself to be in love with the “classics” and have a vast collection of vintage and antique books within my study, I haven’t ever really looked deep into the works of Narnia nor have I paid too much

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald and The First World War

The 1920’s, referred to as The Roaring Twenties, was a great decade to live in. Economics were prosperous, the social diversity was vigorous, and the cultural aspects of the western world was emphasized in almost every way imaginable. Jazz music exploded throughout the streets, modern fashion developed through the ‘flapper’ look of early-twentieth-century women from Britain to

Half the Sky: Emancipation, Rights, and Educating Women

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide is an intriguing book – published in 2009 – that became the perfect candidate for a contemporary movie on ‘rights’. Essentially, the film (and book) showcases the stories of women of all backgrounds from across the globe in an attempt to showcase “gender-based crimes” that

Ernest Hemingway Featured Image

Ernest Hemingway and The First World War

I believe I have to start this article with a thank you to my high school English teacher, who had us read the ‘Hills Like White Elephants‘ – an intriguing little tale full of semi-confusing metaphors and symbolism that buries a sad (and unfortunately realistic) story. As I’ve discussed with people over podcasts and casual discussion throughout

Postmodernism: A Brief Review of The Truth About The Truth

For longtime readers, you should recall my 2015 project The Endless Flow of Society. This review on The Truth About The Truth and the corresponding definition of postmodernism doesn’t go much farther than the introductory pages penned by Walter Truett Anderson, and it is essentially a recreation of my initial pages of my personal project The Endless Flow

Book Review: The Economy of Colonial America by Edwin J. Perkins

Edwin J. Perkins, a leading figure in American economic history and one of the main three authors that depict the economic situations of the colonial era, is an emeritus professor at the University of Southern California. He currently resides in Laguana Woods in California, where he pursues his own research despite being “retired”, and spends

The Elizabethan Renaissance

Book Review: The Elizabethan Renaissance by A. L. Rowse

Alfred Leslie Rowse, oftentimes shortened to A. L. Rowse, is best known for his work on England under Queen Elizabeth I’s reign as monarch. He was born on December 4th, 1903, in Cornwall. Mr. Rowse is the perfect example of a man of greatness born against all odds, as both his mother and father lived

Forging the Star

Book Review: Forging the Star by David S. Turk

A bit of a disclaimer: I was contacted by the University of North Texas Press to review Forging the Star on my website before the book comes out this month. I received a free review copy of the book, but I did not let that cloud my judgement as I read. Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshals Service by David S. Turk is a fantastic read for anyone interested in American history. It’s well written, dedicated to facts, and structured to near-perfection.

Elie Wiesel

Goodnight, Elie Wiesel

Muhammad Ali, David Bowie, Prince, Nancy Reagan. 2016 has been a rather devastating year for deaths. But this one tops the list for me. Elie Wiesel, full name Eliezer Wiesel, was born on September 30th, 1928. A Romanian-born Jewish writer who lived a full life – through the highest highs and lowest lows – Wiesel was an outstanding political activist who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 for speaking out against the repression and violence stemming from racism. Wiesel was the recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal in 1985, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and countless other awards. And, as most people know of him, Wiesel was a Holocaust survivor.

HMS Pinafore

H.M.S. Pinafore: Plot Summary and Analysis

The H.M.S. Pinafore, also known as The Lass That Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera which was first presented at London’s Opera Comique on May 25th, 1878. It should be relevant to discuss how successful this play was during its original running, having exactly 571 performances before fading off the stage – making it the second-longest running of a musical theatre piece at the time. The fourth collaboration between Gilbert and Sullivan, H.M.S. Pinafore was their first international sensation and eventually becoming one of the most intriguing plays of the era.

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