Go to ...

Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

Joseph Kaminski on YouTubeRSS Feed

November 24, 2017

Literature

ulysses-s-grant

Book Review: Ulysses S. Grant – The Unlikely Hero

Ulysses S. Grant: The Unlikely Hero was written by Michael Korda, a man mostly known for his editing skills, who was born in London, United Kingdom in 1933. Korda comes from a family lineage that absolutely cares for the arts, whether it be art in its literal sense or through film and writing. His father,

1864: Lincoln at the Gates of History

Book Review: 1864, Lincoln at the Gates of History

1864: Lincoln at the Gates of History is a work that covers what one may consider as one of the most decisive years of Lincoln’s presidential terms. Charles Bracelen Flood wrote the book, and publishing began in 2009. On November 4, 1929, Charles Flood was born in New York. He graduated from Harvard in 1952

Book Review: Making a New Deal by Lizabeth Cohen

History in general is stained with tales of greatness…tales that that play off the harsh climate of sociopolitical and economic turmoil and celebrate the ingenuity or ‘progress’ made in a world that lacked connections to modern society. It is within Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago 1919-1939 that Cohen tackles the myth of

ironclads

Book Review: Duel Between the First Ironclads

William C. Davis, author of Duel Between the First Ironclads, is a well-respected American historian who spent time as a Professor of History at Virginia Tech from 2000 – 2013; and he has spent most of his career doing research on the American South. He has written around forty books focused on southern U.S. history around

CS-Lewis-featured

C.S. Lewis and The First World War

I’ll be the first to admit that C.S. Lewis is beyond my personal expertise. Although I’ve found myself to be in love with the “classics” and have a vast collection of vintage and antique books within my study, I haven’t ever really looked deep into the works of Narnia nor have I paid too much

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald and The First World War

The 1920’s, referred to as The Roaring Twenties, was a great decade to live in. Economics were prosperous, the social diversity was vigorous, and the cultural aspects of the western world was emphasized in almost every way imaginable. Jazz music exploded throughout the streets, modern fashion developed through the ‘flapper’ look of early-twentieth-century women from Britain to

Half the Sky: Emancipation, Rights, and Educating Women

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide is an intriguing book – published in 2009 – that became the perfect candidate for a contemporary movie on ‘rights’. Essentially, the film (and book) showcases the stories of women of all backgrounds from across the globe in an attempt to showcase “gender-based crimes” that

Ernest Hemingway Featured Image

Ernest Hemingway and The First World War

I believe I have to start this article with a thank you to my high school English teacher, who had us read the ‘Hills Like White Elephants‘ – an intriguing little tale full of semi-confusing metaphors and symbolism that buries a sad (and unfortunately realistic) story. As I’ve discussed with people over podcasts and casual discussion throughout

Postmodernism: A Brief Review of The Truth About The Truth

For longtime readers, you should recall my 2015 project The Endless Flow of Society. This review on The Truth About The Truth and the corresponding definition of postmodernism doesn’t go much farther than the introductory pages penned by Walter Truett Anderson, and it is essentially a recreation of my initial pages of my personal project The Endless Flow

Older Posts››