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Joseph Kaminski

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December 10, 2017

Mankind’s Innovative Ingenuity: Genius or Labor?


This was an article I wrote and published sometime in 2013. However, it remains to be one of my favorite “philosophical rants”, if you wish to call it that. I found it while cleaning up some files this past weekend, so I thought it would be interesting to share. What world do we live in? Was it created by genius or by labor?

What do the Great Pyramids of Giza, the Eiffel Tower, the Sydney Opera House, and all of our other architectural wonders have in common?

The answer is actually incredibly simple, if you really think about it. What do some of the greatest architectural wonders of our history have in common? The obvious answer is it shows us off. Mankind has a severe interest with ego, using wonders as the names mentioned to boost the “progress” and “prosperity” of society and humanity itself. But, if one looks deeper into it all, there’s a bit of a deeper meaning within the sociological similarities between them all as well.

They were all forged in the minds of geniuses, but completed by laborers.The pyramids were thought up by Egyptian pharaohs, men of god among the earth dwellers. The Eiffel Tower was thought up by Gustave Eiffel, a genius architect. Our international wonders, ranging from pieces of art to symbols of the ages, are all staples of innovative ingenuity. All were forged deep inside the minds of innovators, strongholds in the minds of these geniuses, whether they be architects, royalty, or scientists.

However, none of these geniuses actually hand built their marvelous ideas.

The designer of the Sydney Opera House, Jørn Utzon, died without ever seeing the completed beauty his mind had forged. He was not invited to the opening of his work, nor was he even mentioned during any of the ceremonial speeches.

The pyramids were built by slaves as the pharaohs, the intellectuals who had designed and planned the magnificent ancient wonders, watched.

Average workers were called in to forge the Eiffel Tower’s metal frames and even to construct the hull of the Titanic. The world’s greatest wonders, statues, and protected cultural strengths were built by the common man.

All of these man-made wonders of the world our “intellectuals of society” brought into the light were indeed made, finished, or completed by the common man. The average worker, in some cases, completed more of these famous designs and ideas then their own creators ever could.

We credit so much to the individuals who thought of or observed the creation of the symbols of our society, yet tend to ignore the “proletariat” in a sense. So, a question can be asked here. Who should be credited more for the pyramids; the Pharaohs who thought of them or the workers that built them? Is it genius or is it labor that created the world that we live in today?

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