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Joseph Kaminski

History, Sociology, & More

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September 24, 2017

Archives for December 2015

King Louis XVI – Le Décapité One

King Louis XVI, one of the most known figureheads of French History, is also one of the most unlucky leaders of his time. At first, he was popular – with the region seeing him as a young, fit new leader with divine rights. However, as the end of the Old Regime approached and the young King’s world fell apart around him, he proved to be an unfit leader and faced that fact at the guillotine in 1793. Although King Louis was a popular symbol at first, with the people being fairly happy, his overall downfall was his impact on French society overtime. While he and his wife’s own personalities didn’t help their case, with Marie Antoinette sneering “let them eat cake” when told the people had no bread, it was their popularity overtime that ended their reign.

George Pataki Drops From GOP Race

George Pataki is a strange political case. A moderate conservative in an era of radical Republicans, George Pataki has gone almost unheard of throughout his entire campaign for presidency. In an election being dominated by an air-headed racist with a history with bankruptcy, a brain surgeon who doesn’t believe in evolution, and a female CEO (who was fired from the job) who hates women’s rights, someone like George Pataki doesn’t necessarily look like a bad choice, either.

Case Study: R. Budd Dwyer’s Suicide

Robert Budd Dwyer, known as R. Budd Dwyer, was an American Republican politician in Pennsylvania during the early 1970s to the late 1980s. From social studies teacher to senator representing the Pennsylvanian 50th District to the Treasurer of the state itself, he rose through the ranks of society’s politics fairly quickly. However, like many politicians, Mr. Dwyer was caught up in a terrible scandal. No, he didn’t delete 18 minutes of anything; and no, he didn’t sleep with an intern. In fact, he might have done absolutely nothing at all.

Case Study: The Three Faces of Eve

Eve White, a pseudonym used throughout the study to ensure confidentiality, had been recommended to Thigpen and Cleckley after reporting that she was suffering through “severe and blinding headaches.” During her first psychological interview, she complained of periods of amnesia, which she referred to as “blackouts”, after each of her headaches. Her family was apparently not aware of anything that would suggest a loss of consciousness.

What is Tourette Syndrome?

Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations which are called “tics.” The disorder is named for Dr. Georges Gilles de la Tourette, a pioneering French neurologist who first described this condition in the case of an 86-year old French woman way back in 1885. While the first documented and official case revolved around an elderly woman, modern day psychology shows that the earliest symptoms of the disorder are noticed between the ages of three to nine years old. It occurs equally in all ethnic groups, but males are affected about three to four times more than females.

What is Depersonalization?

Individuals who experience depersonalization feel separated from their own personal life and physicality by claiming they sense their body sensations, feelings, emotions and behaviors as not belonging to the same person or identity. Often a person who has experienced this disorder claims that most things seem “unreal” and “hazy”. A recognition of personality breaks down completely — hence the name ‘depersonalization’ — as if one is watching a television show where their real personality is the leading role. Depersonalization can result in extremely high anxiety levels, which further increase these perceptions and further stress out the mind. Individuals suffering through this mental disorder also often find it hard to remember anything they saw or experienced while in this third person state of mind.

What is Bibliomania?

While regular book lovers buy books for the knowledge inside of them, bibliomaniacs amass books, piling them higher and higher and determining their import only by weight, measurement, and exterior qualities knowing they’ll never open them. While people with this “disorder” love books for their outward appearances, normal people tend to like them for the stories inside and what was actually written. For bibliomaniacs, books are treasures to be protected at all costs. For normal book lovers and buyers (often called bibliophiles), books are friends that deserve to be enjoyed by all.

How an Economics Professor Fought Against Monopoly

Ralph Anspach, an American born in 1926, is a retired economics professor from San Fransisco State University. Graduating from the University of Chicago, he fought with the Mahal, volunteers who went to the Middle East to fight in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, in support of the independence of Israel. You may have never heard of Ralph Anspach, but you’ve definitely heard of the famous board game Monopoly, something Anspach despises with a burning passion.

Religion’s God Complex

A person with the undiagnosable disorder of god complex refuses to admit the possibility of any error or failure, even in the face of irrefutable evidence. Highly dogmatic in their views, the one suffering with god complex will speak of their personal opinions, regardless of proof or foundation, as if they were universal law. In short, the person could never possibly be wrong in their own eyes. They show no regard for the basic demands of society in any way, requesting special consideration and considering themselves a part of some illegitimate privilege. They, in some way, believe that they are, in short, divine in their intellectual standpoints.

Top Ten Propaganda Posters

What exactly is propaganda? Propaganda is often defined as any form of communication, usually in the form of posters and other visual aids such as news print, that promotes a certain belief or cause and is often biased. Propaganda is aimed to influence a general population towards a belief, organization, person, or cause. While the idea of propaganda has a strong connection with negativity (mostly due to manipulative uses by Nazi Germany to justify their horrific actions during the Holocaust), propaganda throughout most of history was more often for overall neutral and positive gain. Some examples of positive propaganda would be encouragement for public health, crime stoppers advertisements, and even election banners. In synopsis, propaganda is any encouragement in the form of communication that is used to force an opinion down a population’s throat — whether it be subtle or not.

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